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Book Review: The History of Bees, A Novel

2 Jul

My interest in bee keeping is shown on the Beehaven@OwlCreek tab above.

I struggled with this book.  I also appreciate the story.  Well over half way thru the book, I felt that I was reading multiple Twitter feeds.  Some characters lived in the 1800s, some in the present and some in the future.  The author does bring it together in the end.  If I had first read the Reading Group Guide on page 340 of my digital version, I would not have been so frustrated.

The contents include valuable information about commercial hives and the highly productive, delicate life cycle of bees.

2019 Garden Expansion: May Update

8 May

 

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https://www.rhshumway.com

  1. Gourds (future crafty bird houses and dippers) started in egg cartons on the kitchen counter…they started sprouting I moved them to larger biodegradable containers.
  2. Hummingbird plant and zinnia seeds have been in an outdoor container for a couple of weeks
  3. Trial for fruit trees started with 1 persimmon, then 2 apples and 2 pears, 1 peach and 1 fig.
  4.  More Annual flowers:  Snapdragon, Bells of Ireland, Cockscomb to be planted

Expect future posts on my garden expansion project.

 

First you hear them, then you see them

14 Mar

Sandhill cranes 2019 spring migration.

Check out this video:

Sandhill cranes fly in a “V” formation at a fairly high altitude.  The image is faint as they move from right to left across the screen.

We have been lucky to be outdoors in the early afternoon frequently this spring.  It appears to be the best time to see them in flight…over a half dozen times (central Indiana).

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/sounds  (There are 3 audio clips.)

View one of Indiana’s greatest wildlife spectacles at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area. Each fall, thousands of Sandhill Cranes visit the area’s shallow marshes.

I was introduced to sandhill cranes 20 years ago at the Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area.  They feed and stay overnight during their migration.  Large groups are VERY loud and not a pleasant chorus.  However, it is VERY impressive and you remember their chatter.  I love spotting them on the move.  You hear them first!