Tag Archives: spring

Acorns: Spring planting

11 Mar

We removed dozens of trees @ Owl Creek in 2019…Some had been dead for a long time…  Some were volunteers too close to driveways or barn…Some were contortions of trees…bent, split, broken.  Several logging projects in the past 50 years harvested hard woods…walnut, maple and oak trees.  Our understanding is that oak seedlings are difficult to locate.

 

To get 2020 spring plants off to a bigger start, I gathered acorns from the backyard.  Mostly green, squirrels had not run off with them.

“How to Grow Oak Trees from Acorns” Shelly Wigglesworth Oct 16, 2018, published in New England Today, Living

How to Grow Oak Trees from Acorns

I like the idea of refrigerating with peat and barley in a sealed container over winter.

Shelly recommended discarding acorns with pin holes.  They are made by “inch” worms exiting the hull.  I believe the worms enter under the cap.  After checking closely and drying  about two weeks, I discarded 20 acorns of the 60+ I had gathered from our backyard.

Here we “grow” again…today March 11, 2020…

Responding to the loss oak seedlings ruined by squirrels going for the meat of the acorn…I have turn the table!  Using a small cage to keep wild life out and protect future tree…rather than keep animals IN.  45 acorns in peat pots.

Hmmmm…what yield will we have?

 

 

First you hear them, then you see them

14 Mar

Sandhill cranes 2019 spring migration.

Check out this video:

Sandhill cranes fly in a “V” formation at a fairly high altitude.  The image is faint as they move from right to left across the screen.

We have been lucky to be outdoors in the early afternoon frequently this spring.  It appears to be the best time to see them in flight…over a half dozen times (central Indiana).

https://www.allaboutbirds.org/guide/Sandhill_Crane/sounds  (There are 3 audio clips.)

View one of Indiana’s greatest wildlife spectacles at Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area. Each fall, thousands of Sandhill Cranes visit the area’s shallow marshes.

I was introduced to sandhill cranes 20 years ago at the Jasper-Pulaski Fish and Wildlife Area.  They feed and stay overnight during their migration.  Large groups are VERY loud and not a pleasant chorus.  However, it is VERY impressive and you remember their chatter.  I love spotting them on the move.  You hear them first!

Look UP

9 May

Look DOWN

Hiden inside the clump of lovely daffodils…are they duck eggs?  They seem to be large for duck eggs.  I hope the little ones survived.  I did not realize they were there until they were gone 😦

 

Friday Photos_____________I Ching No. 2 Earth

28 Apr

Clinch Mountain overlook (Obviously a favorite photo…see header)

David Hinton translates hexagram No. 2 as “Earth”.  Wilhem translation is “receptive”.  Other translations include “field” and “flow”.

Field in spring

Eagle Creek watershed

Friday Photos: I Ching No. 3 Sprouting

21 Apr

Sprouting melon seeds

The potential energy is astonishing!  Each one of these melon sprouts can become a vine that produces a dozen melons which each have hundreds of seeds in their center!  These sprouts are from one of last year’s melons, which was from seed Dad saved from the previous year.  Tomatoes can be even more prolific!

Parts of seeds:  embryo, endosperm and coat(protective layer)  Notice in the lower left corner that several seed coats cling to the new leaves.

 

Looking forward to the fruit of these sprouts in mid and late summer!

“Sugar Kiss”, Sand Stone Melon Co. Inc.

Alleluia! Happy Easter!

16 Apr

From the south lawn…Happy Easter!

Friday Photos: I Ching No. 40 Unbound

14 Apr

“Unbound” is David Hinton translation.

South lawn make over begins.

Lilac and Vibernum stumps

Day lilies, hostas and peonies:  Divided from original plantings…critical mass part 2?  Not shown:  coneflowers, asters, plumbago, iris, holly

Hop to it!

11 Apr

Spring to action!  I’ve been on a mission to have properly cleaned windows.

One part:  Fun planter (a gift from years ago) as a “bucket” for supplies

Main part:  New recipe for homemade window cleaner!!! (link below)

Three parts:  Accessories…gloves, paper towels, window scraper

All by the door, ready to “Hop to it!”

Obviously not a bucket

http://www.livingonadime.com/homemade-window-cleaner-recipe/

This says the secret ingredient is alcohol…I thought it was Dawn dishwashing soap.

Friday Photos: A Walk in the Park

10 Mar

Yesterday, Turkey Run State Park

Suspension bridge

Bridge

 

 

 

 

Friends and family

Gardener’s dilemma

17 May
"It's my day to sleep in."

“It’s my day to sleep in.”….”Did you say fresh catnip?”….”I’ll be right down!”

 

Spring mix of perennial volunteers...catnip, lemon balm, oregano and mint...an island in the garden plot.

Spring mix of perennial volunteers…catnip, lemon balm, oregano and mint…an island in the garden plot.  All (except the oregano) take a lot of effort to keep from taking over the garden.

Horehound

Horehound

Rue

Rue

 

Love the foliage and the tameness of these perennials.

 

 

 

 

Tomato seedlings

Six Tomato seedlings

Melon seedlings with room for vines to run along retaining wall.

Melon seedlings with room for vines to run along retaining wall.

 

 

 

 

 

 

I chose very young plants this year due to the unseasonably cool weather.  May need to replant.  I also chose to add a path for access to the six tomato plants.

 

 

 

Path-Before

Path-Before

Dilemma?  25 years ago my kitchen garden was two 8’X8′ raised beds in full sun.  Over the years the transition has been to nearly full shade.  The Earth Angel and Golden Edge Hostas  as well as bird bath and feeders were the new look.  A sweeping retaining wall replaced the original box plots enclosing about 400 square feet.  The dilemma for this season is that we are back to full sun due to the loss of ash trees to disease.  The hostas may not survive a hot August.  Rather than fine tuning the stepping stone path (and have to redo), I took them up and mulched the path.  Check back in the fall on how this season worked out!

 

Path-After

Path-After